City, Craft, and Residence in Mesoamerica

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Full Title: Publication 72, City, Craft, and Residence in Mesoamerica: Research Papers Presented in Honor of Dan M. Healan
Author: Ronald K. Faulseit, Nezahualcoyotl Xiuhtecutli, and Haley Holt Mehta (editors)
Date Published: 2018

Description

This timely volume explores the everyday lives of ancient Mesoamerican people from the Formative through the Postclassic. In honor of Dan Healan, who devoted his life’s work to this theme, several notable scholars present novel research to reconstruct how households produced and exchanged goods; how they carried out private and public rituals; how they built their residences and neighborhoods; organized their towns and cities; earned a living; observed the stars; and even fomented resistance within the powerful Maya, Aztec, Tarascan, Toltec, and Zapotec states.

XV+259 pages; 121 figures; 26 tables; index.

ISBN 978-0-9842028-2-9

 

Table of Contents:

PREFACE

FOREWORD—Nancy Healan

  1. INTRODUCTION: DAN HEALAN’S LASTING IM-PACT ON ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESEARCH IN MESOAMERICA—Ronald K. Faulseit, Nezahualcoyotl Xiuhtecutli, and Haley Holt Mehta

Part One: Craft Production and Residential Archaeology in Mesoamerica

  1. HOUSEHOLD ECONOMIC STRATEGIES AND SOCIAL RESILIENCE IN THE VALLEY OF OAXACA, MEXICO—Ronald K. Faulseit, Gary M. Feinman, and Linda M. Nicholas
  2. CERAMIC PRODUCTION IN HUÁNCITO, MICHOACAN, MEXICO: AN ETHNOARCHAEOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE—Eduardo Williams
  3. LESSONS FROM TETIMPA, A FORMATIVE VILLAGE IN PUEBLA, MEXICO—Patricia Plunket and Gabriela Uruñuela
  4. COMMUNITIES OF PRACTICE AND CERAMIC PRODUCTION AT MATACAPAN, VERACRUZ, MEXICO—Christopher A. Pool
  5. PRISMATIC BLADES AS FAMILY CRAFTS: EARLY PECKED-AND-GROUND PLATFORMS IN THE MANUFACTURING PROCESS AS AN INDICATOR OF HOUSEHOLD PRODUCTION AND DIVISION OF LABOR—Véronique Darras and Jacques Pelegrin
  6. CERAMIC PRODUCTION IN THE TEOTIHUACAN VALLEY: TOWARD A MICROREGIONAL UNDERSTANDING—Destiny Crider, Deborah L. Nichols, and Christopher P. Garraty

Part Two: Tula of the Toltecs: New Research Surrounding Tula, Hidalgo, Mexico

  1. OBSIDIAN CONSUMPTION IN THE TULA REGION AFTER TEOTIHUACAN’S DECLINE: A VIEW FROM CERRO MAGONI—J. Heath Anderson
  2. MORE THAN AN ENCLAVE? ETHNIC IDENTITY AND CULTURAL AFFILIATIONS AT EL TESORO, A CLASSIC PERIOD ZAPOTEC SITE IN THE TULA AREA—Haley Holt Mehta
  3. DARING TO BE DIFFERENT: AZTEC TULA AND THE TRIPLE ALLIANCE’S RELATIONSHIP WITH ITS NORTHERN HINTERLAND—Yanina M. Valdos

Part Three: Urbanization and Society in Late Postclassic Mesoamerica

  1. TLAXCALLAN TRADE NETWORKS AND THE BASIN OF MEXICO: EVIDENCE FROM TEPETICPAC—Nezahualcoyotl Xiuhtecutli
  2. TULA OF THE TOLTECS AND TZINTZUNTZAN OF THE TARASCANS—Helen Perlstein Pollard
  3. SOME NEW EVIDENCE OF LINKS BETWEEN THE VENUS TABLE IN THE DRESDEN CODEX AND THE CENTRAL MEXICAN CODICES—Victoria R. Bricker and Harvey M. Bricker

Part Four: Building on Healan’s Legacy in Northern and Western Mexico

  1. SETTLING THE UCAREO VALLEY: EARLY CLAS-SIC RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN NORTHEASTERN MICHOACAN, MEXICO, AND EASTERN EL BAJÍO—Christine Hernández
  2. CERAMIC CHRONOLOGY FOR CERRO DE LAS VENTANAS, A NORTHERN MESOAMERICAN FRONTIER SITE IN ZACATECAS, MEXICO—Elizabeth A. Oster

Part Five: Final Thoughts

  1. CONCLUDING COMMENTS—Dan M. Healan

EPILOGUE: FORTY-FOUR YEARS OF FRIENDSHIP AND ARCHAEOLOGY WITH DAN HEALAN—Robert H. Cobean